The only way to solve such a situation is by separation. Soon Brer Rabbit comes walking down the road and stops in his tracks when he sees the tar-baby.

In the story, Br'er Fox captured Br'er Rabbit by using the Tar Baby, a glistening child made of tar. Tar-Baby, she ain'y sayin' nuthin', en Brer Fox, he lay low. Bachmann's Tar Baby controversy and the truth about Brer Rabbit The Tar Baby gets a bad rap Posted by Chris Haire on Thu, Apr 19, 2012 at 3:52 PM The more that Br'er Rabbit fights the Tar-Baby, the more entangled he becomes. he Tar-Baby is a doll made of tar and turpentine used to entrap Br'er Rabbit in the second of the Uncle Remus stories. And that’s when he lost his cool.

In the story, Br'er Fox captured Br'er Rabbit by using the Tar Baby, a glistening child made of tar. Br'er Rabbit fought the Tar Baby and became more and more glued to his opponent with every blow.

When the tar baby doesn’t respond, Br’er Rabbit becomes enraged and strikes him, becoming ensnared. Bre’r Rabbit kicked the Tar Baby with his feet, and then all of him was stuck to the Tar Baby. In modern usage, "tar baby" refers to any "sticky situation" that is only aggravated by additional contact. So Br’er Rabbit punched the Tar Baby in the head. Tar-Baby stayed still, and Brer Fox, he lay low. Br’er Rabbit comes upon the tar baby along the road and tells him good morning.

She des hilt on, en de Brer Rabbit lose de use er his feet in de same way. Presently, Brer Rabbit drew back his fist and -BLIP- he hit the Tar-Baby on the side of the head. Brer Rabbit keep on asking, and the Tar-Baby kept on saying nothing.

Brer Fox, he lay low. His fist stuck and he couldn’t get loose.


Brer Rabbit, trickster figure originating in African folklore and transmitted by African slaves to the New World, where it acquired attributes of similar native American tricksters (see trickster tale); Brer, or Brother, Rabbit was popularized in the United States in the stories of Joel Chandler Harris (1848–1908). In modern usage, tar baby refers to a problematic situation that is only aggravated by additional involvement with it. His fist stuck tight to the Tar Baby’s head and he could not get loose. Br'er Rabbit begged Br'er Fox for anything except to be thrown somewhere until the fox did so, which was exactly what the rabbit wanted, and so he escaped. Bre’r Rabbit hit the Tar Baby with the other hand, and then that hand got stuck too. "Br'er Rabbit and the Tar-Baby" was a story.
Br'er Rabbit fought the Tar Baby and became more and more glued to his opponent with every blow. "`Tu'n me loose, fo' I kick de natal stuffin' outen you,' sez Brer Rabbit, sezee, but de Tar-Baby, she ain't sayin' nuthin'. "Br'er Rabbit and the Tar-Baby" was a story.

The Tar-Baby is the second of the Uncle Remus stories published in 1881; it is about a doll made of tar and turpentine used by the villainous Br'er Fox to entrap Br'er Rabbit.The more that Br'er Rabbit fights the Tar-Baby, the more entangled he becomes. In the Tar baby story, Br’er Fox concocts a baby made up of tar and turpentine in order to ensnare Br’er Rabbit.